Morphological Structures in the Language of Disadvantaged and Advantaged Children Two groups of preschool children, 25 culturally disadvantaged and 25 culturally advantaged, were matched by mental age and compared in their ability to apply morphological rules to unfamiliar situations. A comparison of morphology scores between the groups revealed no statistically significant difference. Several hypotheses are advanced to account for the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1968
Morphological Structures in the Language of Disadvantaged and Advantaged Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Thomas H. Shriner
    University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois
  • Lynn Miner
    University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1968
Morphological Structures in the Language of Disadvantaged and Advantaged Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1968, Vol. 11, 605-610. doi:10.1044/jshr.1103.605
History: Received July 17, 1967
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1968, Vol. 11, 605-610. doi:10.1044/jshr.1103.605
History: Received July 17, 1967

Two groups of preschool children, 25 culturally disadvantaged and 25 culturally advantaged, were matched by mental age and compared in their ability to apply morphological rules to unfamiliar situations. A comparison of morphology scores between the groups revealed no statistically significant difference. Several hypotheses are advanced to account for the lack of significant differences between the two groups. It is suggested that when relevant variables are controlled, and with respect to the morphological language abilities measured in this study, the labels “culturally disadvantaged” and “culturally advantaged” may be misnomers.

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