Perceived Nasality in the Speech of the Deaf Listener ratings of nasality were obtained from samples of deaf and normal speech presented in the backward play mode. In order to investigate the influence of rhythmic patterning on the perception of nasality, seven of the normal speakers also produced the samples in a word-by-word fashion. Statistically significant differences in ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1968
Perceived Nasality in the Speech of the Deaf
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Raymond H. Colton
    University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
  • Harry S. Cooker
    University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1968
Perceived Nasality in the Speech of the Deaf
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1968, Vol. 11, 553-559. doi:10.1044/jshr.1103.553
History: Received February 23, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1968, Vol. 11, 553-559. doi:10.1044/jshr.1103.553
History: Received February 23, 1968

Listener ratings of nasality were obtained from samples of deaf and normal speech presented in the backward play mode. In order to investigate the influence of rhythmic patterning on the perception of nasality, seven of the normal speakers also produced the samples in a word-by-word fashion. Statistically significant differences in mean ratings of nasality were found between the experimental and control groups and between the reduced-tempo and normal-tempo groups. In general, deaf speakers are perceived as more nasal than normal speakers. Furthermore, normal speakers are perceived as more nasal when speaking at a reduced tempo than when speaking at a normal tempo. Much of the perceived nasality in the speech of the deaf may be a natural consequence of reduced speaking tempo, and therapeutic techniques designed to increase speaking tempo may produce a concomitant reduction in perceived nasality.

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