A Proposed Clinical Test of Speech Discrimination The Modified Rhyme Test (MRT) has been adapted to the needs of the clinical audiologist. Tape recordings of three speakers, one female and two males, were made, evaluated, and assembled in a format suitable for use as a clinical tool. Special attention was given to ensure an appropriate carrier phrase, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1968
A Proposed Clinical Test of Speech Discrimination
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • E. James Kreul
    Stanford Research Institute, Menlo Park, California
  • James C. Nixon
    Stanford Research Institute, Menlo Park, California
  • Karl D. Kryter
    Stanford Research Institute, Menlo Park, California
  • Donald W. Bell
    Stanford Research Institute, Menlo Park, California
  • Janna S. Lang
    Stanford Research Institute, Menlo Park, California
  • Earl D. Schubert
    Stanford University, Palo Alto, California
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1968
A Proposed Clinical Test of Speech Discrimination
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1968, Vol. 11, 536-552. doi:10.1044/jshr.1103.536
History: Received January 29, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1968, Vol. 11, 536-552. doi:10.1044/jshr.1103.536
History: Received January 29, 1968

The Modified Rhyme Test (MRT) has been adapted to the needs of the clinical audiologist. Tape recordings of three speakers, one female and two males, were made, evaluated, and assembled in a format suitable for use as a clinical tool. Special attention was given to ensure an appropriate carrier phrase, consistent timing sequences, well-controlled recordings, simplified instructions, and test forms. The tests were administered to panels of listeners, and the results were assessed for possible effects of learning, speaker or listener differences, and comparability of test lists. The recordings are available, for all three speakers, with the noise adjusted to yield approximately the same percentage of correct responses for normal listeners, 96, 83, and 75% correct.

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