Intrasubject Variability in amplitude of Bekesy Tracings and Its Relation to Measures of Personality Test-retest measures of Bekesy amplitude were obtained from 10 normal-hearing adults on 8 different days. These measures were analyzed to determine: (1) the extent of intrasubject variability among repeated measures of Bekesy amplitudes traced by normal-hearing subjects, and (2) the relation of intrasubject differences in Bekesy amplitudes to day-to-day changes ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1968
Intrasubject Variability in amplitude of Bekesy Tracings and Its Relation to Measures of Personality
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David C. Shepherd
    The Jewish Hospital of St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri
  • Robert Goldstein
    The Jewish Hospital of St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1968
Intrasubject Variability in amplitude of Bekesy Tracings and Its Relation to Measures of Personality
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1968, Vol. 11, 523-535. doi:10.1044/jshr.1103.523
History: Received March 6, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1968, Vol. 11, 523-535. doi:10.1044/jshr.1103.523
History: Received March 6, 1968

Test-retest measures of Bekesy amplitude were obtained from 10 normal-hearing adults on 8 different days. These measures were analyzed to determine: (1) the extent of intrasubject variability among repeated measures of Bekesy amplitudes traced by normal-hearing subjects, and (2) the relation of intrasubject differences in Bekesy amplitudes to day-to-day changes in anxiety and other measures of personality construct. Findings indicate that intrasubject variability in the amplitude of Bekesy tracings produced by normal-hearing subjects is less than reported measures of intersubject variability of Bekesy amplitudes obtained from groups of normal-hearing subjects. Subjects who traced narrow Bekesy amplitudes scored significantly higher on measures of anxiety and depression than did those who traced moderate or wide amplitudes. Wide swingers scored higher on a measure of defensiveness than did moderate or narrow swingers, and moderate swingers were significantly more defensive than narrow swingers. Day-to-day changes in anxiety did not relate to day-to-day changes in Bekesy amplitudes traced by any one of the 10 subjects.

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