Effects of Method of Measurement on Most Comfortable Loudness Level for Speech Eighteen college men and 18 college women, all with normal hearing, were tested for the effects of three variables upon most comfortable loudness (MCL) level for speech. These variables were: (1) three measurement methods, (2) sex of listener, and (3) repeated testing. MCL levels for speech were measured in an ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1968
Effects of Method of Measurement on Most Comfortable Loudness Level for Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lennart L. Kopra
    University of Texas, Austin, Texas
  • Dennis Blosser
    University of Texas, Austin, Texas
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1968
Effects of Method of Measurement on Most Comfortable Loudness Level for Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1968, Vol. 11, 497-508. doi:10.1044/jshr.1103.497
History: Received April 3, 1967
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1968, Vol. 11, 497-508. doi:10.1044/jshr.1103.497
History: Received April 3, 1967

Eighteen college men and 18 college women, all with normal hearing, were tested for the effects of three variables upon most comfortable loudness (MCL) level for speech. These variables were: (1) three measurement methods, (2) sex of listener, and (3) repeated testing. MCL levels for speech were measured in an initial test session and a retest session by the method of adjustment, the method of limits, and the Bekesy audiometer.

Results showed that: (1) all three measurement methods produced similar mean MCL levels in both test and retest, (2) mean MCL levels did not change significantly from test to retest for any single measurement method, (3) sex of listener did not significantly affect mean MCL level, (4) MCL levels as measured by the three methods were significantly correlated, (5) test-retest correlations for each measurement method were significant, and (6) Bekesy audiometer tracings of MCL level remained stable over the four and one-half minute test periods in both initial test sessions and in retest sessions.

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