Sensory Modality and Object-Naming in Aphasia Twenty-seven aphasics, 12 right-brain-injured, and 12 normal subjects were presented with 16 objects for tactile naming, 16 for auditory naming, and 16 for olfactory naming. All 48 objects were also presented for visual naming. Comparison between groups was based on the percentage difference in response latencies between naming by vision ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1968
Sensory Modality and Object-Naming in Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Harold Goodglass
    Boston Veterans Administration Hospital and Boston University Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Melvin I. Barton
    Boston Veterans Administration Hospital and Boston University Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Edith F. Kaplan
    Boston Veterans Administration Hospital and Boston University Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1968
Sensory Modality and Object-Naming in Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1968, Vol. 11, 488-496. doi:10.1044/jshr.1103.488
History: Received February 8, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1968, Vol. 11, 488-496. doi:10.1044/jshr.1103.488
History: Received February 8, 1968

Twenty-seven aphasics, 12 right-brain-injured, and 12 normal subjects were presented with 16 objects for tactile naming, 16 for auditory naming, and 16 for olfactory naming. All 48 objects were also presented for visual naming. Comparison between groups was based on the percentage difference in response latencies between naming by vision and naming by each of the other modalities. Analysis of variance showed no significant differences. The order of increasing difficulty of stimuli was the same for all groups, with aphasics showing consistently larger differences in latency than the other two groups. With few exceptions, the aphasics' naming scores were less than 1 SD unit apart in all modalities.

It was concluded that a modality nonspecific process intervenes between stimulus presentation and naming.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access