Responses to Multiple-Choice Intelligibility Tests Multiple-choice intelligibility tests consisting of four-word response sets were administered to listeners at four signal-to-noise ratios and at four signal levels. Three types of analysis were made. (1) The response sets themselves were studied for phonetic-phonemic disparity; (2) the correct responses to the sets were tallied (intelligibility scores) and studied; ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1968
Responses to Multiple-Choice Intelligibility Tests
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John W. Black
    Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1968
Responses to Multiple-Choice Intelligibility Tests
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1968, Vol. 11, 453-466. doi:10.1044/jshr.1103.453
History: Received July 19, 1967
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1968, Vol. 11, 453-466. doi:10.1044/jshr.1103.453
History: Received July 19, 1967

Multiple-choice intelligibility tests consisting of four-word response sets were administered to listeners at four signal-to-noise ratios and at four signal levels. Three types of analysis were made. (1) The response sets themselves were studied for phonetic-phonemic disparity; (2) the correct responses to the sets were tallied (intelligibility scores) and studied; and (3) the distribution of responses within each set was measured (uncertainty) and studied. The analyses of the tests indicated: (1) a limited relation between phonetic-phonemic disparity within a set and the correct responses; (2) the tendency of “easy” and “hard” response sets to maintain their relative ranks from one listening condition to another; (3) the correct responses and the uncertainty of the response sets were negatively correlated; and (4) in an analysis of the errors the relative frequency of occurrence of the error responses was not a constant from one listening condition to another. Based on the obtained data, a procedure is suggested for determining these frequencies if the correct score is known.

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