The Use of a Compound Unconditioned Stimulus in Electrodermal Audiometry The EDR to a 1,000 Hz tone was conditioned in four groups of 10 normal adult subjects each. A different type of unconditioned stimulus was used in the conditioning of each group: (a) a vibratory stimulus alone, (b) an electric shock alone, (c) simultaneous vibration and shock, and (d) shock ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1966
The Use of a Compound Unconditioned Stimulus in Electrodermal Audiometry
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John E. Watson
    University of Tennessee College of Medicine, Memphis, Tennessee
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1966
The Use of a Compound Unconditioned Stimulus in Electrodermal Audiometry
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1966, Vol. 9, 611-618. doi:10.1044/jshr.0904.611
History: Received January 3, 1966
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1966, Vol. 9, 611-618. doi:10.1044/jshr.0904.611
History: Received January 3, 1966

The EDR to a 1,000 Hz tone was conditioned in four groups of 10 normal adult subjects each. A different type of unconditioned stimulus was used in the conditioning of each group: (a) a vibratory stimulus alone, (b) an electric shock alone, (c) simultaneous vibration and shock, and (d) shock or vibration presented randomly an equal number of times. Comparison of frequency and amplitude of the conditioned responses observed during extinction trials in each of the groups indicated that the paired stimuli, whether presented simultaneously or randomly, produced a highly significant increase in responsiveness. It is concluded that the use of a compound unconditioned stimulus in electrodermal audiometry would increase the efficiency of the method.

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