The Spoken Syntax of Normal, Hard-of-Hearing, and Deaf Children A spoken language sample of 50 sentences was obtained from 30 normal and 30 hearing-impaired children and quantified according to total output and syntactical accuracy. A total score of structural accuracy (syntax) was obtained by combining the errors of addition, omission, substitution, and word order. The hard-of-hearing subgroup resembled the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1966
The Spoken Syntax of Normal, Hard-of-Hearing, and Deaf Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John B. Brannon, Jr.
    Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
  • Thomas Murry
    Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1966
The Spoken Syntax of Normal, Hard-of-Hearing, and Deaf Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1966, Vol. 9, 604-610. doi:10.1044/jshr.0904.604
History: Received February 3, 1966
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1966, Vol. 9, 604-610. doi:10.1044/jshr.0904.604
History: Received February 3, 1966

A spoken language sample of 50 sentences was obtained from 30 normal and 30 hearing-impaired children and quantified according to total output and syntactical accuracy. A total score of structural accuracy (syntax) was obtained by combining the errors of addition, omission, substitution, and word order. The hard-of-hearing subgroup resembled the control group in its total output of words, but the deaf subgroup was significantly lower in this measure. The differences between syntax scores were significant among all three groups. A moderate correlation was found between average hearing loss and total words uttered; a higher correlation resulted when hearing loss and measures of syntax were paired.

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