Effects of Delayed Auditory Feedback and Pronounceability on Immediate Recall and Key Pressing Nonsense syllable trigrams representing three levels of verbal pronounceability were read by 84 subjects under conditions of either delayed or simultaneous auditory feedback. Results indicated that, consistent with previous research, DAF produced a general disruptive effect on key pressing rates as well as on recall scores. However, for all criterion ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1966
Effects of Delayed Auditory Feedback and Pronounceability on Immediate Recall and Key Pressing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • William M. Shearer
    Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois
  • Seymore Simon
    Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1966
Effects of Delayed Auditory Feedback and Pronounceability on Immediate Recall and Key Pressing
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1966, Vol. 9, 546-549. doi:10.1044/jshr.0904.546
History: Received February 21, 1966
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1966, Vol. 9, 546-549. doi:10.1044/jshr.0904.546
History: Received February 21, 1966

Nonsense syllable trigrams representing three levels of verbal pronounceability were read by 84 subjects under conditions of either delayed or simultaneous auditory feedback. Results indicated that, consistent with previous research, DAF produced a general disruptive effect on key pressing rates as well as on recall scores. However, for all criterion measures, the interaction between pronounceability values of materials and DAF was found not to be statistically significant, indicating that the disruption was nonselective. Further, disruption from DAF was found to persist at equal levels for all syllables in the list.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access