The Relationship Between Word Association and Grammatical Classes in Aphasia A word association test consisting of five each of nouns, adjectives, adverbs, verbs, and prepositions was administered orally to fifty aphasic and fifty nonaphasic patients. Associations were scored homogeneous (same part of speech as the stimulus) or heterogeneous (not the same part of speech as the stimulus). Aphasics gave the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1966
The Relationship Between Word Association and Grammatical Classes in Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joyce W. Sefer
    Veterans Administration Hospital, Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • Ernest H. Henrikson
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1966
The Relationship Between Word Association and Grammatical Classes in Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1966, Vol. 9, 529-541. doi:10.1044/jshr.0904.529
History: Received April 25, 1966
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1966, Vol. 9, 529-541. doi:10.1044/jshr.0904.529
History: Received April 25, 1966

A word association test consisting of five each of nouns, adjectives, adverbs, verbs, and prepositions was administered orally to fifty aphasic and fifty nonaphasic patients. Associations were scored homogeneous (same part of speech as the stimulus) or heterogeneous (not the same part of speech as the stimulus). Aphasics gave the same proportion of homogeneous responses to each part of speech as nonaphasics, although aphasics gave a significantly smaller total number of homogeneous responses. Syntagmatic (completion) responses and paradigmatic (same part of speech) responses were negatively correlated in both groups. It was concluded that (1) aphasics show a significantly lower number of homogeneous responses than nonaphasics; (2) aphasic word association behavior follows the same general pattern of variance by part-of-speech as that of nonaphasics; (3) syntagmatic and paradigmatic responses are negatively correlated in both aphasics and nonaphasics.

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