Electroencephalographic Analysis During Stuttering and Nonstuttering Thirteen male stuttering subjects were paired with thirteen male nonstuttering subjects by age, handedness, and stuttering pattern. Stuttered speech from nonstutterers was obtained by training them to mimic the stuttering pattern of their partners. Nonstuttered speech from stutterers was obtained by adaptation. Occipital EEGs were recorded during silence, stuttered speech, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1966
Electroencephalographic Analysis During Stuttering and Nonstuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Donna Russell Fox
    University of Houston, Houston, Texas
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1966
Electroencephalographic Analysis During Stuttering and Nonstuttering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1966, Vol. 9, 488-497. doi:10.1044/jshr.0904.488
History: Received January 21, 1966
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1966, Vol. 9, 488-497. doi:10.1044/jshr.0904.488
History: Received January 21, 1966

Thirteen male stuttering subjects were paired with thirteen male nonstuttering subjects by age, handedness, and stuttering pattern. Stuttered speech from nonstutterers was obtained by training them to mimic the stuttering pattern of their partners. Nonstuttered speech from stutterers was obtained by adaptation. Occipital EEGs were recorded during silence, stuttered speech, and nonstuttered speech for both groups of subjects. Electronic analyses which may indicate disruptions not apparent by visual inspection, indicate differences in the EEGs of stutterers and nonstutterers during stuttering with the eyes closed, but these differences are probably the result of behavior and not of neuronal dysfunction. Stuttered and nonstuttered speech behavior is sufficient to disrupt the EEG display, which suggests that differences may be the result of the type of behavior.

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