The Occlusion Effect in Bone Conduction Hearing This experiment tested the hypothesis that the occlusion effect is accompanied by an increase in sound pressure level in the external auditory canal. Pure tone bone conduction thresholds and sound pressure levels were measured, first with the ear canal open, then with the ear canal closed, at two positions of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1965
The Occlusion Effect in Bone Conduction Hearing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David P. Goldstein
    Purdue University, Lafayette, Indiana
  • Claude S. Hayes
    University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1965
The Occlusion Effect in Bone Conduction Hearing
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1965, Vol. 8, 137-148. doi:10.1044/jshr.0802.137
History: Received February 23, 1965
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1965, Vol. 8, 137-148. doi:10.1044/jshr.0802.137
History: Received February 23, 1965

This experiment tested the hypothesis that the occlusion effect is accompanied by an increase in sound pressure level in the external auditory canal. Pure tone bone conduction thresholds and sound pressure levels were measured, first with the ear canal open, then with the ear canal closed, at two positions of the bone vibrator and at five frequencies in 28 normal listeners. Statistical analyses revealed a significant difference between measures at 250, 500, and 1 000 cps but not at 2 000 and 4 000 cps. Average sound pressure level shifts tended to be larger than their threshold measure counterparts. The two measures, nevertheless, yielded positive correlations.

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