Effect of a Competing Message on Synthetic Sentence Identification The function relating performance to intensity for synthetic sentence message sets presented in quiet is exceedingly steep. Two experiments were conducted to determine the degree to which the performance-intensity (P-I) function could be flattened by adding a competing message at selected message-competition ratios. Data were obtained from five trained listeners ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1967
Effect of a Competing Message on Synthetic Sentence Identification
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Charles Speaks
    Research Institute of the Houston Speech and Hearing Center, Houston, Texas
  • Jane L. Karmen
    Research Institute of the Houston Speech and Hearing Center, Houston, Texas
  • Luis Benitez
    Research Institute of the Houston Speech and Hearing Center, Houston, Texas
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1967
Effect of a Competing Message on Synthetic Sentence Identification
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1967, Vol. 10, 390-395. doi:10.1044/jshr.1002.390
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1967, Vol. 10, 390-395. doi:10.1044/jshr.1002.390

The function relating performance to intensity for synthetic sentence message sets presented in quiet is exceedingly steep. Two experiments were conducted to determine the degree to which the performance-intensity (P-I) function could be flattened by adding a competing message at selected message-competition ratios. Data were obtained from five trained listeners in a criterion-controlled experiment and 23 naive listeners in a criterion-free experiment. Addition of the competing message flattened the P-I function substantially. The degree of flattening was related to the presentation level of the messages.

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