Speech and Hearing Characteristics in Familial Dysautonomia Eleven individuals previously diagnosed as having familial dysautonomia were tested by means of the Templin-Darley articulation test and pure tone audiometry to determine their speech and hearing performances. The most frequently misarticulated sounds were /l/, /s/, /z/, /∫/, and /r/, with sound distortion being the most frequendy occurring type of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1967
Speech and Hearing Characteristics in Familial Dysautonomia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Harvey Halpern
    Queens College, City University of New York, Flushing, New York
  • Irving Hochberg
    New York University, New York, New York
  • Norma Rees
    Queens College, City University of New York, Flushing, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1967
Speech and Hearing Characteristics in Familial Dysautonomia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1967, Vol. 10, 361-366. doi:10.1044/jshr.1002.361
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1967, Vol. 10, 361-366. doi:10.1044/jshr.1002.361

Eleven individuals previously diagnosed as having familial dysautonomia were tested by means of the Templin-Darley articulation test and pure tone audiometry to determine their speech and hearing performances. The most frequently misarticulated sounds were /l/, /s/, /z/, /∫/, and /r/, with sound distortion being the most frequendy occurring type of misarticulation. The articulatory defects appeared to be due to dysarthric disturbance manifested by difficulty with gross and fine motor control, coupled with general retarded motor development. Audiometric hearing levels (ASA-1951) were within normal limits.

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