The Effects of Three Types of Stimulation on Articulatory Responses of Speech Defective Children An analysis was made of the effects of three methods of stimulation on the responses elicited from the first grade school children. Forty children (25 males and 15 females) who had defective articulation were used as the subjects. Three methods of stimulation were used: picture stimulus, auditory stimulus, and auditory-visual ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1967
The Effects of Three Types of Stimulation on Articulatory Responses of Speech Defective Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Myrna W. Smith
    University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia
  • Stanley Ainsworth
    University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1967
The Effects of Three Types of Stimulation on Articulatory Responses of Speech Defective Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1967, Vol. 10, 333-338. doi:10.1044/jshr.1002.333
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1967, Vol. 10, 333-338. doi:10.1044/jshr.1002.333

An analysis was made of the effects of three methods of stimulation on the responses elicited from the first grade school children. Forty children (25 males and 15 females) who had defective articulation were used as the subjects. Three methods of stimulation were used: picture stimulus, auditory stimulus, and auditory-visual stimulus with ten selected consonant sounds.

The children did not have the same number of articulatory errors when tested by the three methods. More errors were elicited from both males and females by the Picture Stimulus Method. This result was obtained with regard to the total errors and when the three methods were compared with regard to the initial, medial and final positions. Fewer errors were identified by the Auditory Stimulus Method. The least number of errors was found by the Auditory-Visual Stimulus Method.

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