Graphemic, Phonetic, and Associative Factors in the Verbal Behavior of Deaf and Hearing Subjects The performance of deaf and hearing high school subjects was compared on several tasks designed to assess relevant cues in the decoding of words. Deaf subjects tended to use graphemic cues more than hearing subjects in two word association tests (N = 151 and 145 deaf subjects, 325 and 327 ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1967
Graphemic, Phonetic, and Associative Factors in the Verbal Behavior of Deaf and Hearing Subjects
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard L. Blanton
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee
  • Jum C. Nunnally
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee
  • Penelope B. Odom
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1967
Graphemic, Phonetic, and Associative Factors in the Verbal Behavior of Deaf and Hearing Subjects
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1967, Vol. 10, 225-231. doi:10.1044/jshr.1002.225
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1967, Vol. 10, 225-231. doi:10.1044/jshr.1002.225

The performance of deaf and hearing high school subjects was compared on several tasks designed to assess relevant cues in the decoding of words. Deaf subjects tended to use graphemic cues more than hearing subjects in two word association tests (N = 151 and 145 deaf subjects, 325 and 327 hearing subjects). On a word-pair retention task (N = 62 group), however, the deaf were able to remember more pairs than hearing subjects, regardless of whether the pairs were related associatively, graphemically, or phonologically. The associated pairs were remembered best by all groups. It is concluded that the lack of auditory-vocal cues does not hinder the storage and retrieval of individual words in the deaf and, therefore, is probably not a factor in their language deficiency.

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