Peak Intraoral Air Pressures During Speech Peak intraoral air pressures were recorded during speech acts of ten children and ten adults by use of a polyethylene tube positioned in the oral-pharyngeal cavity. These pressures were measured during selected consonants spoken under a variety of conditions. Air pressures for voiceless consonants were found to be significantly higher ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1967
Peak Intraoral Air Pressures During Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Herbert J. Arkebauer
    Concordia Teachers College, River Forest, Illinois
  • Thomas J. Hixon
    University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin
  • James C. Hardy
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1967
Peak Intraoral Air Pressures During Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1967, Vol. 10, 196-208. doi:10.1044/jshr.1002.196
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1967, Vol. 10, 196-208. doi:10.1044/jshr.1002.196

Peak intraoral air pressures were recorded during speech acts of ten children and ten adults by use of a polyethylene tube positioned in the oral-pharyngeal cavity. These pressures were measured during selected consonants spoken under a variety of conditions. Air pressures for voiceless consonants were found to be significantly higher than for voiced consonants, and higher peak intraoral air pressures were associated with stop consonants than with continuant consonants. For adults, successively higher magnitudes of peak intraoral air pressures were found at progressively higher levels of speech intensity. For the children, higher pressures were associated with consonants in the intervocalic context than in pre- and postvocalic contexts.

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