Comfort Level and Loudness Matching for Continuous and Interrupted Signals A series of studies was conducted to investigate previously reported intensity differences found between interrupted and continuous tonal signals when normal listeners tracked loudness on a Bekesy-type audiometer. Loudness tracking was investigated for test signals fixed at a single frequency and varied continuously over a frequency range of two decades. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1967
Comfort Level and Loudness Matching for Continuous and Interrupted Signals
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • William Melnick
    Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1967
Comfort Level and Loudness Matching for Continuous and Interrupted Signals
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1967, Vol. 10, 99-109. doi:10.1044/jshr.1001.99
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1967, Vol. 10, 99-109. doi:10.1044/jshr.1001.99

A series of studies was conducted to investigate previously reported intensity differences found between interrupted and continuous tonal signals when normal listeners tracked loudness on a Bekesy-type audiometer. Loudness tracking was investigated for test signals fixed at a single frequency and varied continuously over a frequency range of two decades. Listeners used two different criteria: (1) most-comfortable-loudness level; (2) loudness of a Standard signal intensity. When the test frequency was fixed or when the Standard signal was presented at frequent intervals during the loudness-matching procedure, differences between the interrupted and continuous signal were predictable from temporal integration or summation data. Greater differences were observed only when the listener was instructed to use a comfortable-loudness criterion for a continuously changing test frequency. These large differences between levels for the interrupted and continuous signals are explained in terms of subjectively inadequate definition of the Standard loudness and the effect of auditory events immediately preceding a loudness judgment.

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