The Ability of Deaf and Hearing Children to Apply Morphological Rules A paper and pencil test, devised to assess knowledge of morphological rules, was administered to 140 deaf students, aged 7 to 19, and to 176 hearing students, aged 7 to 18. Although the hearing subjects' performance was strikingly superior, patterns of item difficulty were similar for both groups. Scores were ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1967
The Ability of Deaf and Hearing Children to Apply Morphological Rules
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert L. Cooper
    Yeshiva University, New York, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1967
The Ability of Deaf and Hearing Children to Apply Morphological Rules
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1967, Vol. 10, 77-86. doi:10.1044/jshr.1001.77
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1967, Vol. 10, 77-86. doi:10.1044/jshr.1001.77

A paper and pencil test, devised to assess knowledge of morphological rules, was administered to 140 deaf students, aged 7 to 19, and to 176 hearing students, aged 7 to 18. Although the hearing subjects' performance was strikingly superior, patterns of item difficulty were similar for both groups. Scores were related to reading achievement, although a subsidiary investigation indicated that difficulties in reading test items did not depress test score. The tendency to base responses on irregular models increased with age. Deaf children’s low scores on conventional indices of verbal development may reflect their inadequate knowledge of English formational rules.

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