Effects of Verbal Decision Behavior upon Respiration During Speech Production This study tests the hypothesis that respiratory activity during induced silent pausing decreases when the speaker is faced with increased demands upon decision behavior. Two conditions, reasoned to impose restrictions upon the hypothesis, were manipulated in addition to the variable of decision demand: (1) the grammatical environment in which silent ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1967
Effects of Verbal Decision Behavior upon Respiration During Speech Production
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ralph Webb
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
  • Frederick Williams
    University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin
  • Fred D. Minifie
    University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1967
Effects of Verbal Decision Behavior upon Respiration During Speech Production
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1967, Vol. 10, 49-56. doi:10.1044/jshr.1001.49
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1967, Vol. 10, 49-56. doi:10.1044/jshr.1001.49

This study tests the hypothesis that respiratory activity during induced silent pausing decreases when the speaker is faced with increased demands upon decision behavior. Two conditions, reasoned to impose restrictions upon the hypothesis, were manipulated in addition to the variable of decision demand: (1) the grammatical environment in which silent pausing was induced, and (2) the level of breath supply at the moment of pause inducement. Continuous measures of breathing were obtained by use of a respirometer while subjects were performing an oral reading task which involved decision-making during a two-second induced silence. The breathing measures were subsequently divided into eight quarter-second intervals for analysis. Results indicated that the only outcome supportive of the hypothesis was in the last half-second of the “hold” period in the case of within phrase environments. Such results were independent of the breath supply conditions. Further analyses indicated that lower mean values of air moved in the increased decision demand condition were a function of fewer subjects breathing, rather than of subjects breathing less.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access