Descriptive Analysis of Audiometric and Psychometric Scores of Students at a School for the Deaf A statistical description of routine audiometric and psychometric scores of the 177 children enrolled in the school divisions of Central Institute for the Deaf during the academic year 1964–1965 showed some characteristics of the groups not easily obtained from clinical impressions of individuals. Comparisons of earliest audiograms with the most ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1967
Descriptive Analysis of Audiometric and Psychometric Scores of Students at a School for the Deaf
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lois L. Elliott
    Central Institute for the Deaf, St. Louis, Missouri
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1967
Descriptive Analysis of Audiometric and Psychometric Scores of Students at a School for the Deaf
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1967, Vol. 10, 21-40. doi:10.1044/jshr.1001.21
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1967, Vol. 10, 21-40. doi:10.1044/jshr.1001.21

A statistical description of routine audiometric and psychometric scores of the 177 children enrolled in the school divisions of Central Institute for the Deaf during the academic year 1964–1965 showed some characteristics of the groups not easily obtained from clinical impressions of individuals. Comparisons of earliest audiograms with the most recent ones showed remarkable stability over time; hearing levels of the several groups did not change. When ordinary audiometers were supplemented by separate oscillators and amplifiers with consequent higher output powers, only five children failed to respond at 1,000 Hz or lower frequencies and 88% responded at 2,000 Hz. Skewed distributions of audiometric results necessitated use of group medians and percentiles (rather than means) for comparisons among groups. Uneven performance was observed on subtests of both intelligence and achievement batteries. While all groups were described as severely hearing-impaired, children in the Division for Speech Pathology also had learning or language problems.

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