Effects of Abstractness, Meaningfulness, and Phonetic Structure on Auditory Recognition of Nouns One-syllable words defined in an earlier study as to meaningfulness (m) and two measures of abstractness (c and s) with familiarity held constant were presented under masking noise conditions to 30 normal and 60 mentally defective subjects. High and low abstract words were matched for initial phoneme or phoneme blend. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1966
Effects of Abstractness, Meaningfulness, and Phonetic Structure on Auditory Recognition of Nouns
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Otfried Spreen
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
  • John G. Borkowski
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
  • Alan M. Gordon
    Woodward State Hospital and School, Woodward, Iowa
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1966
Effects of Abstractness, Meaningfulness, and Phonetic Structure on Auditory Recognition of Nouns
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1966, Vol. 9, 619-625. doi:10.1044/jshr.0904.619
History: Received December 17, 1965
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1966, Vol. 9, 619-625. doi:10.1044/jshr.0904.619
History: Received December 17, 1965

One-syllable words defined in an earlier study as to meaningfulness (m) and two measures of abstractness (c and s) with familiarity held constant were presented under masking noise conditions to 30 normal and 60 mentally defective subjects. High and low abstract words were matched for initial phoneme or phoneme blend. The results indicated that over-all recognition scores were not significantly related to intelligence and that high m and high c words were more easily recognized in both groups. The defective group showed a stronger relationship between c, s, and recognition than did the normal group, although statistical significance for this difference between groups was not obtained. Brain-damaged and cultural-familial defectives did not show a significant difference in the effect of these parameters. No significant relationship was found between the performance on Halstead’s Category Test and IQ or abstractness level of words. Initial phonemes affected recognition in a consistent pattern; the “phonetic hierarchies” for the two groups as well as those obtained in previous studies were similar.

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