A Study of the Central Auditory Processes in Stutterers Using the Synthetic Sentence Identification (SSI) Test Battery The performance of a group of stutterers (n = 14) and a group of nonstutterers (n = 14) was compared on the Synthetic Sentence Identification Test (Speaks and Jerger, 1965). The test is designed to assess central auditory function. It was hypothesized that because of subtle neurologically based differences in ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1978
A Study of the Central Auditory Processes in Stutterers Using the Synthetic Sentence Identification (SSI) Test Battery
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mark M. Toscher
    University of California at Santa Barbara
  • Ralph R. Rupp
    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1978
A Study of the Central Auditory Processes in Stutterers Using the Synthetic Sentence Identification (SSI) Test Battery
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1978, Vol. 21, 779-792. doi:10.1044/jshr.2104.779
History: Received November 21, 1977 , Accepted March 13, 1978
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1978, Vol. 21, 779-792. doi:10.1044/jshr.2104.779
History: Received November 21, 1977; Accepted March 13, 1978

The performance of a group of stutterers (n = 14) and a group of nonstutterers (n = 14) was compared on the Synthetic Sentence Identification Test (Speaks and Jerger, 1965). The test is designed to assess central auditory function. It was hypothesized that because of subtle neurologically based differences in perceptual processing, the performance of the two groups would differ significantly on one or more of the subtests. An analysis of variance revealed that the performance of the stuttering group was significantly poorer (0.01 level of confidence) than that of the nonstutterers on the Ipsilateral Competing Message Subtest. The results of the investigation were compatible with other studies that suggest a neurological dysfunction within the central auditory apparatus as at least one of the underlying causes of disfluency. It was concluded that further investigations of the central auditory processes in stutterers are warranted to make a more definitive statement about the etiology of stuttering.

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