Stapedial Reflex and Anxiety in Fluent and Disfluent Speakers Stapedial reflex thresholds were obtained from fluent and disfluent subjects with and without anxiety. Anxiety conditions were measured by monitoring palmar skin resistance with a psychogalvanometer. Eight of nine disfluent speakers had decreased mean stapedial-reflex thresholds (−2.5 to −10 dB) at 500 or 1000 Hz or both when anxiety was ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1978
Stapedial Reflex and Anxiety in Fluent and Disfluent Speakers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linda J. Horovitz
    The State University of New York College at Fredonia
  • Sheryl B. Johnson
    The State University of New York College at Fredonia
  • Ronald C. Pearlman
    The State University of New York College at Fredonia
  • Elliott J. Schaffer
    The State University of New York College at Fredonia
  • Anne K. Hedin
    Women’s Christian Association Hospital, Jamestown, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1978
Stapedial Reflex and Anxiety in Fluent and Disfluent Speakers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1978, Vol. 21, 762-767. doi:10.1044/jshr.2104.762
History: Received September 28, 1977 , Accepted April 10, 1978
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1978, Vol. 21, 762-767. doi:10.1044/jshr.2104.762
History: Received September 28, 1977; Accepted April 10, 1978

Stapedial reflex thresholds were obtained from fluent and disfluent subjects with and without anxiety. Anxiety conditions were measured by monitoring palmar skin resistance with a psychogalvanometer. Eight of nine disfluent speakers had decreased mean stapedial-reflex thresholds (−2.5 to −10 dB) at 500 or 1000 Hz or both when anxiety was present. This phenomenon did not occur in the fluent group. Only two of the nine fluent subjects showed reflex change with anxiety and the mean reflex change was shown in an increase of +2.5 dB. The disfluent group’s mean stapedial reflex was significantly different with and without anxiety status (a = 0.01). Mean reflex for the fluent group did not change with anxiety.

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