Interference and the Persistence of Articulatory Responses An experimental test of the effect of phonological interference on short-term recall was conducted using non-English phonological sequences which were easily pronounceable. Subjects were normal speaking and normal hearing third-grade English speaking children. Experimental subjects produced the phonologically inadmissible [3a], [u′mÎ], [vε], and control subjects produced the phonologically allowable [d3a], ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1978
Interference and the Persistence of Articulatory Responses
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Harris Winitz
    University of Missouri, Kansas City
  • Betty Bellerose
    University of Missouri, Kansas City
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1978
Interference and the Persistence of Articulatory Responses
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1978, Vol. 21, 715-721. doi:10.1044/jshr.2104.715
History: Received September 30, 1977 , Accepted May 2, 1978
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1978, Vol. 21, 715-721. doi:10.1044/jshr.2104.715
History: Received September 30, 1977; Accepted May 2, 1978

An experimental test of the effect of phonological interference on short-term recall was conducted using non-English phonological sequences which were easily pronounceable. Subjects were normal speaking and normal hearing third-grade English speaking children. Experimental subjects produced the phonologically inadmissible [3a], [u′mÎ], [vε], and control subjects produced the phonologically allowable [d3a], [u′mî], [vei]. Following a retention interval of 30 sec, one free recall trial was administered. Experimental subjects correctly recalled significantly less often than control subjects, suggesting that phonological rules can effect a decrement in short-term recall for phonetic units which are easy to pronounce.

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