Processing Demands During Auditory Learning Under Degraded Listening Conditions This investigation employed measures of learning accuracy (performance) and learning ease (attention or psychological effort) to assess processing demands during auditory learning under degraded listening conditions. Learning accuracy was measured with a highly intelligible paired-associate learning task presented to 49 normal-hearing adults under different signal-to-competition ratios and signal presentation levels. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1978
Processing Demands During Auditory Learning Under Degraded Listening Conditions
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David W. Downs
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Michael A. Crum
    Veterans Administration Hospital, Albuquerque, New Mexico
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1978
Processing Demands During Auditory Learning Under Degraded Listening Conditions
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1978, Vol. 21, 702-714. doi:10.1044/jshr.2104.702
History: Received September 30, 1977 , Accepted March 16, 1978
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1978, Vol. 21, 702-714. doi:10.1044/jshr.2104.702
History: Received September 30, 1977; Accepted March 16, 1978

This investigation employed measures of learning accuracy (performance) and learning ease (attention or psychological effort) to assess processing demands during auditory learning under degraded listening conditions. Learning accuracy was measured with a highly intelligible paired-associate learning task presented to 49 normal-hearing adults under different signal-to-competition ratios and signal presentation levels. Learning ease was assessed by a simultaneously presented probe reaction-time task. Final results indicated that (1) primary signal presentation level exerted no effect either on learning accuracy or ease, and (2) the introduction of competing speech into the listening environment exerted no effect on learning performance, but resulted in a significant increase in learning effort. These findings have important implications for listening conditions in educational settings, hearing aid selection, education of hearing-impaired and learning-disabled children, and future study of attentional demands during auditory processing.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access