Analytic Study of the Tadoma Method: Discrimination Ability of Untrained Observers This study reports the ability of two observers with normal-hearing and sight to discriminate pairs of speech elements through the Tadoma method of speechread-ing. The observers were blindfolded and exposed to masking noise to eliminate visual and auditory cues. They placed their right hand over the speaker’s face and neck ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1978
Analytic Study of the Tadoma Method: Discrimination Ability of Untrained Observers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Charlotte M. Reed
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge
  • Steven I. Rubin
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge
  • Louis D. Braida
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge
  • Nathaniel I. Durlach
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1978
Analytic Study of the Tadoma Method: Discrimination Ability of Untrained Observers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1978, Vol. 21, 625-637. doi:10.1044/jshr.2104.625
History: Received January 20, 1978 , Accepted May 24, 1978
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1978, Vol. 21, 625-637. doi:10.1044/jshr.2104.625
History: Received January 20, 1978; Accepted May 24, 1978

This study reports the ability of two observers with normal-hearing and sight to discriminate pairs of speech elements through the Tadoma method of speechread-ing. The observers were blindfolded and exposed to masking noise to eliminate visual and auditory cues. They placed their right hand over the speaker’s face and neck so that the thumb rested lightly on the lips and the fingers fanned out over the cheek and neck. The discrimination tests were conducted using an ABX procedure. Average discrimination scores for the five types of test materials used in the ABX tests were 87% on W-22 words, 83% on Modified Rhyme Test words, 70% on vowels, 77% on CV and VC nonsense syllables, and 71% on consonant clusters. In all of the ABX tests, the inexperienced observers performed at least as well as the experienced Tadoma user studied by Norton, et al (1977). This finding indicates that the basic tactile sensitivity of inexperienced observers is comparable to that of an experienced deaf-blind Tadoma user.

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