A Right-Ear Effect for Auditory Feedback Control of Children’s Newly Acquired Phonemes To determine the relative importance of binaural, right-ear, and left-ear auditory feedback control on the correct production of newly acquired articulatory patterns in children, 40 children exhibiting misarticulations were tested under four experimental conditions. The children were individually administered a shortened version of the Deep Test of Articulation (McDonald, 1964) ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1978
A Right-Ear Effect for Auditory Feedback Control of Children’s Newly Acquired Phonemes
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Walter H. Manning
    Memphis State University, Memphis, Tennessee
  • Linda J. Louko
    Edmonton Public School Board, Alberta
  • Vincent S. DiSalvo
    University of Nebraska, Lincoln
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1978
A Right-Ear Effect for Auditory Feedback Control of Children’s Newly Acquired Phonemes
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1978, Vol. 21, 580-588. doi:10.1044/jshr.2103.580
History: Received January 10, 1978 , Accepted March 14, 1978
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1978, Vol. 21, 580-588. doi:10.1044/jshr.2103.580
History: Received January 10, 1978; Accepted March 14, 1978

To determine the relative importance of binaural, right-ear, and left-ear auditory feedback control on the correct production of newly acquired articulatory patterns in children, 40 children exhibiting misarticulations were tested under four experimental conditions. The children were individually administered a shortened version of the Deep Test of Articulation (McDonald, 1964) under (1) a no-masking condition, followed in a counterbalanced order by readministration of the Deep Test under conditions of (2) binaural masking, (3) monaural right-ear masking, and (4) monaural left-ear masking. Correct articulatory production by the children was significantly reduced under binaural and monaural right-ear masking. There was, however, no significant reduction in the children’s correct production under the condition of monaural left-ear masking. The results extend previous findings of right-ear superiority for children’s auditory processing of externally produced stimuli to the closed-loop auditory feedback control of children’s own speech production.

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