Speech-Discrimination Scores Modeled as a Binomial Variable Many studies have reported variability data for tests of speech discrimination, and the disparate results of these studies have not been given a simple explanation. Arguments over the relative merits of 25- vs 50-word tests have ignored the basic mathematical properties inherent in the use of percentage scores. The present ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1978
Speech-Discrimination Scores Modeled as a Binomial Variable
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Aaron R. Thornton
    University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • Michael J. M. Raffin
    Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1978
Speech-Discrimination Scores Modeled as a Binomial Variable
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1978, Vol. 21, 507-518. doi:10.1044/jshr.2103.507
History: Received September 5, 1977 , Accepted January 3, 1978
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1978, Vol. 21, 507-518. doi:10.1044/jshr.2103.507
History: Received September 5, 1977; Accepted January 3, 1978

Many studies have reported variability data for tests of speech discrimination, and the disparate results of these studies have not been given a simple explanation. Arguments over the relative merits of 25- vs 50-word tests have ignored the basic mathematical properties inherent in the use of percentage scores. The present study models performance on clinical tests of speech discrimination as a binomial variable. A binomial model was developed, and some of its characteristics were tested against data from 4120 scores obtained on the CID Auditory Test W-22. A table for determining significant deviations between scores was generated and compared to observed differences in half-list scores for the W-22 tests. Good agreement was found between predicted and observed values. Implications of the binomial characteristics of speech-discrimination scores are discussed.

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