Performance of Children with Good and Poor Articulation on Tasks of Tongue Placement This study determined whether children could learn to replicate four positions of lingual-palatal contact with and without topical anesthesia that eliminated touch-pressure sensations. First-grade boys, nine with good articulation skills and nine with poor articulation skills, were used as subjects. Results suggest that individuals are able to learn nonspeech tasks ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1978
Performance of Children with Good and Poor Articulation on Tasks of Tongue Placement
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linda Smith Jordan
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • James C. Hardy
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Hughlett L. Morris
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1978
Performance of Children with Good and Poor Articulation on Tasks of Tongue Placement
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1978, Vol. 21, 429-439. doi:10.1044/jshr.2103.429
History: Received January 14, 1977 , Accepted January 3, 1978
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1978, Vol. 21, 429-439. doi:10.1044/jshr.2103.429
History: Received January 14, 1977; Accepted January 3, 1978

This study determined whether children could learn to replicate four positions of lingual-palatal contact with and without topical anesthesia that eliminated touch-pressure sensations. First-grade boys, nine with good articulation skills and nine with poor articulation skills, were used as subjects. Results suggest that individuals are able to learn nonspeech tasks of tongue positioning by relying on muscle spindles or deep receptors within the tongue, or both, or by relying on lingual touch-pressure or other surface receptors within the tongue, or, by a combination of deep and surface receptors of the tongue. Further, tongue positioning need not be dependent on touch-pressure or superficial tactile mechanisms. Children with relatively severe articulation problems performed more poorly on the tasks of precise tongue placement than children with good articulation skills. And finally, children with relatively severe articulation problems may be able to improve their initially poor performance on tongue placement tasks with specific training on those tasks, implying that this group did receive the intraoral sensory feedback necessary to learn the task, but that more experience was needed for the learning to occur.

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