Comprehension of Inflectional Morphemes by Deaf Children Exposed to a Visual English Sign System A test of morpheme-based concepts was administered to 67 deaf children who were exposed to Seeing Essential English (SEE). Results indicated that these children show the following order of acquisition for the inflectional morphemes tested: plural -s, past tense -ed, present progressive -ing, possessive -'s, third person present indicative -s, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1978
Comprehension of Inflectional Morphemes by Deaf Children Exposed to a Visual English Sign System
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael J. M. Raffin
    Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois
  • Julia M. Davis
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Leslea A. Gilman
    Keystone Area Education Agency, Dubuque, Iowa
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1978
Comprehension of Inflectional Morphemes by Deaf Children Exposed to a Visual English Sign System
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1978, Vol. 21, 387-400. doi:10.1044/jshr.2102.387
History: Received March 9, 1977 , Accepted November 9, 1977
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1978, Vol. 21, 387-400. doi:10.1044/jshr.2102.387
History: Received March 9, 1977; Accepted November 9, 1977

A test of morpheme-based concepts was administered to 67 deaf children who were exposed to Seeing Essential English (SEE). Results indicated that these children show the following order of acquisition for the inflectional morphemes tested: plural -s, past tense -ed, present progressive -ing, possessive -'s, third person present indicative -s, comparative -er, superlative -est, and present perfect -en. There were no effects of sex, age, or school from which the subjects were selected. The main contribution to the subjects' performances were their lengths of exposure to SEE.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access