Presentation by Order of Difficulty of Test Tasks to Persons with Aphasia To determine the effects of arranging test tasks by order of difficulty, two test forms were administered to each of 20 patients with aphasia. The two test forms were split halves of the Porch Index of Communicative Ability. One of the test forms, Form EH, was presented to each patient ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1978
Presentation by Order of Difficulty of Test Tasks to Persons with Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Donna L. Dumond
    Institute of Logopedics, Wichita, Kansas
  • James C. Hardy
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Ann A. Van Demark
    Veterans Administration Hospital, Iowa City
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1978
Presentation by Order of Difficulty of Test Tasks to Persons with Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1978, Vol. 21, 350-360. doi:10.1044/jshr.2102.350
History: Received April 25, 1977 , Accepted October 19, 1977
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1978, Vol. 21, 350-360. doi:10.1044/jshr.2102.350
History: Received April 25, 1977; Accepted October 19, 1977

To determine the effects of arranging test tasks by order of difficulty, two test forms were administered to each of 20 patients with aphasia. The two test forms were split halves of the Porch Index of Communicative Ability. One of the test forms, Form EH, was presented to each patient with the subtests arranged for the individual subject in an order from easy to hard. The other test form, Form HE, was administered to each subject in the hard-to-easy order. There was no significant difference between the performance of the subjects on the Form EH and their performance on Form HE.

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