Effects of Cerebellar Lesions on Monkey Jaw-Force Control: Implications for Understanding Ataxic Dysarthria Eight macaques were trained on one of two isometric force regulation tasks. Six animals were trained to maintain a static force for a 2-sec period, and two animals were trained to make a rapid series of bites on a force transducer four times in succession. Electromyographic (EMG) electrodes were chronically ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1978
Effects of Cerebellar Lesions on Monkey Jaw-Force Control: Implications for Understanding Ataxic Dysarthria
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Charles R. Larson
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Dwight Sutton
    University of Washington, Seattle
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1978
Effects of Cerebellar Lesions on Monkey Jaw-Force Control: Implications for Understanding Ataxic Dysarthria
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1978, Vol. 21, 309-323. doi:10.1044/jshr.2102.309
History: Received May 31, 1977 , Accepted September 9, 1977
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1978, Vol. 21, 309-323. doi:10.1044/jshr.2102.309
History: Received May 31, 1977; Accepted September 9, 1977

Eight macaques were trained on one of two isometric force regulation tasks. Six animals were trained to maintain a static force for a 2-sec period, and two animals were trained to make a rapid series of bites on a force transducer four times in succession. Electromyographic (EMG) electrodes were chronically implanted into temporalis and masseter muscles. Lesions were made in the cerebellum in seven monkeys and a control surgery with no neural damage was performed on one monkey. Following cerebellar lesions, the abilities of the monkeys to maintain a static isometric force for 2 sec were impaired. Animals overshot the correct force band and force tremors increased in amplitude following the lesions. Cerebellar lesions were followed also by a reduction in biting frequency from about 3 Hz to 2 Hz. Measurements of the temporalis EMG indicated that the reduced biting rate was associated primarily with a prolongation of the inter-EMG interval and secondarily with a prolongation of the EMG duration. Changes in jaw-force regulation following the lesions appear to be similar to the types of changes observed in arm control in monkeys, and in the speech of persons with ataxic dysarthria.

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