Acoustic-Reflex Dynamics for Pulsed Signals Contralateral acoustic-reflex measurements were taken for 10 normal-hearing subjects using a pulsed broadband noise as the reflex-activating signal. Acoustic impedance was measured at selected times during the on (response maximum) and off (response minimum) portions of the pulsed activator over a 2-min interval as a function of activator period and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1978
Acoustic-Reflex Dynamics for Pulsed Signals
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Terry L. Wiley
    University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • Raymond S. Karlovich
    University of Wisconsin, Madison
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1978
Acoustic-Reflex Dynamics for Pulsed Signals
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1978, Vol. 21, 295-308. doi:10.1044/jshr.2102.295
History: Received March 8, 1977 , Accepted September 1, 1977
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1978, Vol. 21, 295-308. doi:10.1044/jshr.2102.295
History: Received March 8, 1977; Accepted September 1, 1977

Contralateral acoustic-reflex measurements were taken for 10 normal-hearing subjects using a pulsed broadband noise as the reflex-activating signal. Acoustic impedance was measured at selected times during the on (response maximum) and off (response minimum) portions of the pulsed activator over a 2-min interval as a function of activator period and duty cycle. Major findings were that response maxima increased as a function of time for longer duty cycles and that response minima increased as a function of time for all duty cycles. It is hypothesized that these findings are attributable to the recovery characteristics of the stapedius muscle. An explanation of portions of the results from previous temporary threshold shift experiments on the basis of acoustic-reflex dynamics is proposed.

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