Correlates of Psychological Dimensions in Talker Similarity This investigation identifies correlates of psychological dimensions in talker similarity. Twenty adult male talkers recorded a monosyllabic word, and 13 acoustic measurements were made from spectrograms of each talker’s production. All possible pairs of voices were presented to 11 adult listeners for similarity judgments via a paired-comparison paradigm. A four-dimensional ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1978
Correlates of Psychological Dimensions in Talker Similarity
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brian E. Walden
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D.C.
  • Allen A. Montgomery
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D.C.
  • George J. Gibeily
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D.C.
  • Robert A. Prosek
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D.C.
  • Daniel M. Schwartz
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D.C.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1978
Correlates of Psychological Dimensions in Talker Similarity
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1978, Vol. 21, 265-275. doi:10.1044/jshr.2102.265
History: Received July 5, 1977 , Accepted August 15, 1977
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1978, Vol. 21, 265-275. doi:10.1044/jshr.2102.265
History: Received July 5, 1977; Accepted August 15, 1977

This investigation identifies correlates of psychological dimensions in talker similarity. Twenty adult male talkers recorded a monosyllabic word, and 13 acoustic measurements were made from spectrograms of each talker’s production. All possible pairs of voices were presented to 11 adult listeners for similarity judgments via a paired-comparison paradigm. A four-dimensional INDSCAL analysis of the similarity ratings was employed to derive psychological dimensions of talker similarity. Correlations between the acoustic measurements and the INDSCAL dimensions revealed that fundamental frequency and word duration were moderately correlated with two of the psychological dimensions. The other two dimensions were not convincingly correlated with any of the acoustic measurements, but are best described as representing voice quality and talker age. A listener’s familiarity with the talkers did not seem to influence his judgment of voice similarity.

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