Experimental Acquisition of Wh-Questions in Language-Disordered Children Twenty-four language-disordered children were trained, through modeling with a problem-solving set, to produce a question form involving a wh- word—who, what, or where—in a structure requiring either auxiliary is or auxiliary does. Results indicated the subsequent use of the trained auxiliary across wh- words and, to a lesser extent, the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1978
Experimental Acquisition of Wh-Questions in Language-Disordered Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M. Jeanne Wilcox
    Memphis State University, Tennessee
  • Laurence B. Leonard
    Memphis State University, Tennessee
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1978
Experimental Acquisition of Wh-Questions in Language-Disordered Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1978, Vol. 21, 220-239. doi:10.1044/jshr.2102.220
History: Received May 31, 1977 , Accepted August 6, 1977
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1978, Vol. 21, 220-239. doi:10.1044/jshr.2102.220
History: Received May 31, 1977; Accepted August 6, 1977

Twenty-four language-disordered children were trained, through modeling with a problem-solving set, to produce a question form involving a wh- word—who, what, or where—in a structure requiring either auxiliary is or auxiliary does. Results indicated the subsequent use of the trained auxiliary across wh- words and, to a lesser extent, the subsequent use of untrained as well as trained wh- words. These results suggest that the training of one multioperation structure may result in the acquisition of two partially independent linguistic operations. Such patterns of acquisition could result in an increase in the efficiency of language training.

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