Perceptual Assessment of Normalcy of Speech Following Stuttering Therapy Stuttering therapy procedures such as rhythmic or prolonged speech have been criticized because afterward the subject may speak fluently but also abnormally. Although assessments of the normalcy of speech behavior have been rare, some recent procedures have included perceptual assessments of certain dimensions of speech behavior. This study reports an ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1978
Perceptual Assessment of Normalcy of Speech Following Stuttering Therapy
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Roger J. Ingham
    Cumberland College of Health Sciences, Sydney, Australia
  • Ann C. Packman
    Cumberland College of Health Sciences, Sydney, Australia
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1978
Perceptual Assessment of Normalcy of Speech Following Stuttering Therapy
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1978, Vol. 21, 63-73. doi:10.1044/jshr.2101.63
History: Received October 15, 1976 , Accepted June 27, 1977
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1978, Vol. 21, 63-73. doi:10.1044/jshr.2101.63
History: Received October 15, 1976; Accepted June 27, 1977

Stuttering therapy procedures such as rhythmic or prolonged speech have been criticized because afterward the subject may speak fluently but also abnormally. Although assessments of the normalcy of speech behavior have been rare, some recent procedures have included perceptual assessments of certain dimensions of speech behavior. This study reports an evaluation procedure where listeners endeavored to distinguish between intermingled speech samples obtained from treated stutterers and a peer group of normally fluent speakers. Different groups of listeners were asked to judge the prosody, rate, fluency, and naturalness of posttreatment samples from a group of stutterers treated with a prolonged speech procedure, and a matched peer group of normally fluent speakers. No significant differences were found between the assessments of stutterers and normally fluent speakers. However, when another group of listeners was asked to decide whether the speech samples were from treated stutterers or normal speakers, the stutterers received significantly fewer normal speaker judgments. Interrelationships between the judgment scales were evaluated along with a forced-choice procedure for assessing the normalcy of individual speech samples.

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