A Comparison of the Effects of Filtering and Sensorineural Hearing Loss on Patterns of Consonant Confusions It has been found that listeners with sensorineural hearing loss who show similar patterns of consonant confusions also tend to have similar audiometric profiles. The present study determined whether normal listeners, presented with filtered speech, would produce consonant confusions similar to those previously reported for the hearing-impaired listener. Consonant confusion ... Research Article
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Research Article  |   March 01, 1978
A Comparison of the Effects of Filtering and Sensorineural Hearing Loss on Patterns of Consonant Confusions
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marilyn D. Wang
    University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore
  • Charlotte M. Reed
    University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • Robert C. Bilger
    University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1978
A Comparison of the Effects of Filtering and Sensorineural Hearing Loss on Patterns of Consonant Confusions
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1978, Vol. 21, 5-36. doi:10.1044/jshr.2101.05
History: Received February 28, 1977 , Accepted August 2, 1977
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1978, Vol. 21, 5-36. doi:10.1044/jshr.2101.05
History: Received February 28, 1977; Accepted August 2, 1977

It has been found that listeners with sensorineural hearing loss who show similar patterns of consonant confusions also tend to have similar audiometric profiles. The present study determined whether normal listeners, presented with filtered speech, would produce consonant confusions similar to those previously reported for the hearing-impaired listener. Consonant confusion matrices were obtained from eight normal-hearing subjects for four sets of CV and VC nonsense syllables presented under six high-pass and six low-pass filtering conditions. Patterns of consonant confusion for each condition were described using phonological features in a sequential information analysis. Severe low-pass filtering produced consonant confusions comparable to those of listeners with high-frequency hearing loss. Severe high-pass filtering gave a result comparable to that of patients with flat or rising audiograms. And, mild filtering resulted in confusion patterns comparable to those of listeners with essentially normal hearing. An explanation in terms of the spectrum, the level of speech, and the configuration of the individual listener’s audiogram is given.

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