An Experimental Analysis of Misarticulating Children’s Generalization Five children who produced /θ/ for /s/ substitutions as a Disarticulation were trained to produce /s/ correctly in three syllables. Untrained exemplars of syllables and words were tested throughout baseline and training. The 60 probe items contained both spontaneous and imitated words and syllables combined with high, low, front, back ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1978
An Experimental Analysis of Misarticulating Children’s Generalization
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary Elbert
    Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Leija V. McReynolds
    University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1978
An Experimental Analysis of Misarticulating Children’s Generalization
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1978, Vol. 21, 136-150. doi:10.1044/jshr.2101.136
History: Received March 15, 1977 , Accepted October 1, 1977
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1978, Vol. 21, 136-150. doi:10.1044/jshr.2101.136
History: Received March 15, 1977; Accepted October 1, 1977

Five children who produced /θ/ for /s/ substitutions as a Disarticulation were trained to produce /s/ correctly in three syllables. Untrained exemplars of syllables and words were tested throughout baseline and training. The 60 probe items contained both spontaneous and imitated words and syllables combined with high, low, front, back vowels, and consonants. A functional analysis reversal design was used, and the generalization patterns were analyzed. The effect of context was found to be less influential than expected while other factors such as stimulability, amount of training, and subject characteristics appeared as important variables in generalization.

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