Structural Characteristics of Monologues in the Speech of Normal Children: Semantic and Conversational Aspects Semantic and conversational aspects of monologues in the speech of normal children were investigated. Subjects were nine children, three each at Brown’s language Stages I, II, and III. A two-hour language sample, containing alternations of dialogue with the examiner and monologue produced during independent play, was collected from each child. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1978
Structural Characteristics of Monologues in the Speech of Normal Children: Semantic and Conversational Aspects
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tanya M. Gallagher
    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • Holly K. Craig
    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1978
Structural Characteristics of Monologues in the Speech of Normal Children: Semantic and Conversational Aspects
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1978, Vol. 21, 103-117. doi:10.1044/jshr.2101.103
History: Received July 14, 1977 , Accepted August 14, 1977
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1978, Vol. 21, 103-117. doi:10.1044/jshr.2101.103
History: Received July 14, 1977; Accepted August 14, 1977

Semantic and conversational aspects of monologues in the speech of normal children were investigated. Subjects were nine children, three each at Brown’s language Stages I, II, and III. A two-hour language sample, containing alternations of dialogue with the examiner and monologue produced during independent play, was collected from each child. Results indicate that the semantic and conversational categories that occurred in monologue speech were similar to those that appeared in contextually matched dialogue speech but the proportional frequencies differed. Monologue subsamples were generally short in length and had a sequencing pattern that was highly consistent and semantically organized. Results are discussed in terms of Piagetian cognitive theory and pragmatic language models.

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