Effect of Auditory Prestimulation on Naming in Aphasia In five aphasic subjects, picture naming alone was compared with picture naming in the presence of four different auditory cues. Eighty words represented by pictures were associated with the following auditory cues: the first phoneme of the target word; an open-ended sentence designed to elicit the target word; three words, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1977
Effect of Auditory Prestimulation on Naming in Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bonnie Louise Podraza
    Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota
  • Frederic L. Darley
    Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1977
Effect of Auditory Prestimulation on Naming in Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1977, Vol. 20, 669-683. doi:10.1044/jshr.2004.669
History: Received July 17, 1976 , Accepted May 4, 1977
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1977, Vol. 20, 669-683. doi:10.1044/jshr.2004.669
History: Received July 17, 1976; Accepted May 4, 1977

In five aphasic subjects, picture naming alone was compared with picture naming in the presence of four different auditory cues. Eighty words represented by pictures were associated with the following auditory cues: the first phoneme of the target word; an open-ended sentence designed to elicit the target word; three words, one of which was the target word; three words, all semantically related to the target word. Three conditions—the phonetic cue, the open-ended sentence, and the set of three words containing the target word—facilitated naming significantly. The condition making use of semantically related words resulted in a significant decrease in naming performance. Implications of these findings for theories of verbal recall, impairment of verbal recall in aphasia, and language therapy are discussed.

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