Laryngeal Behavior During Stuttering Laryngeal behavior associated with 101 stutterings (part-word repetitions, sound prolongations, and broken words) produced by a group of 10 stutterers was observed by means of a flexible fiberoptic naso-laryngoscope. Results indicated that 60% of part-word repetitions were different from fluent productions of the same speech segment in terms of laryngeal ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1977
Laryngeal Behavior During Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Edward G. Conture
    Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York
  • Gerald N. McCall
    State University of New York, Upstate Medical Center, Syracuse
  • David W. Brewer
    State University of New York, Upstate Medical Center, Syracuse
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1977
Laryngeal Behavior During Stuttering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1977, Vol. 20, 661-668. doi:10.1044/jshr.2004.661
History: Received March 10, 1976 , Accepted February 24, 1977
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1977, Vol. 20, 661-668. doi:10.1044/jshr.2004.661
History: Received March 10, 1976; Accepted February 24, 1977

Laryngeal behavior associated with 101 stutterings (part-word repetitions, sound prolongations, and broken words) produced by a group of 10 stutterers was observed by means of a flexible fiberoptic naso-laryngoscope. Results indicated that 60% of part-word repetitions were different from fluent productions of the same speech segment in terms of laryngeal behavior, and 72% of sound prolongations were similar to fluent productions of the same speech segment. Findings indicate that there are differences in laryngeal behavior among the various types of stutterings.

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