Subjective Evaluation of Articulatory Effort Thirty-two adult speakers repeated pairs of CV syllables, each embedded in a carrier phrase, and designated the consonant member of the pair they believed required more articulatory effort. The task was performed under three speaking conditions (1) normal conversational speech, (2) whispered speech, and (3) pantomimed speech. Voicing and fricative ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1977
Subjective Evaluation of Articulatory Effort
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Martha Parnell
    University of Missouri, Columbia
  • James D. Amerman
    University of Missouri, Columbia
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1977
Subjective Evaluation of Articulatory Effort
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1977, Vol. 20, 644-652. doi:10.1044/jshr.2004.644
History: Received August 3, 1976 , Accepted May 3, 1977
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1977, Vol. 20, 644-652. doi:10.1044/jshr.2004.644
History: Received August 3, 1976; Accepted May 3, 1977

Thirty-two adult speakers repeated pairs of CV syllables, each embedded in a carrier phrase, and designated the consonant member of the pair they believed required more articulatory effort. The task was performed under three speaking conditions (1) normal conversational speech, (2) whispered speech, and (3) pantomimed speech. Voicing and fricative manner of production appeared to be related to judgments of greater articulatory effort. Highly consistent responses across the three speaking conditions suggest other psychological factors to which subjects respond during conditions of normal as well as subvocal modes of speaking. Analyses yielded significant correlations between articulatory effort responses and current data concerning children’s phonological acquisition, children’s phoneme substitution patterns, and frequency of occurrence of consonants in conversational English.

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