Contextual-Coarticulatory Inconsistency of /r/ Misarticulation Ten children who misarticulated /r/ participated in a task designed to survey inconsistent misarticulatory behavior. Children repeated 51 sentences during each of three trials. All sentences contained a single occurrence of an allophone of /r/ in systematically permuted, lexically constrained (LC) or nonlexically constrained (NLC) CrV contexts or nonlexically constrained ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1977
Contextual-Coarticulatory Inconsistency of /r/ Misarticulation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paul R. Hoffman
    Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Gordon H. Schuckers
    Louisiana State University Medical Center, Shreveport
  • David L. Ratusnik
    Rush-Presbyterian-St. Lukes Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1977
Contextual-Coarticulatory Inconsistency of /r/ Misarticulation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1977, Vol. 20, 631-643. doi:10.1044/jshr.2004.631
History: Received December 1, 1976 , Accepted April 20, 1977
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1977, Vol. 20, 631-643. doi:10.1044/jshr.2004.631
History: Received December 1, 1976; Accepted April 20, 1977

Ten children who misarticulated /r/ participated in a task designed to survey inconsistent misarticulatory behavior. Children repeated 51 sentences during each of three trials. All sentences contained a single occurrence of an allophone of /r/ in systematically permuted, lexically constrained (LC) or nonlexically constrained (NLC) CrV contexts or nonlexically constrained (NLC) CɚCV contexts. Results suggested that reliable judgment procedures were employed and that a high degree of internal consistency was present for the sentence repetition task. All children demonstrated inconsistent misarticulation of the target phonemes. Target allophones, in order of least to more often correctly produced, were (NLC) [r], (LC) [r], and (NLC) [ɚ]. Correct production of [r] within NLC contexts occurred more frequently when preceded by /k/ and when followed by the vowels /i/, /ae/, and /u/. The target allophone [r] in LC clusters was produced correctly more often within /k/ and /t/ contexts than in /p/ contexts. Vocalic [ɚ] was produced correctly more often within /tɚC/ and /kɚC/ contexts than when in others in which /k/, /n/, /t/, and /p/ were permuted. Data suggest that certain anticipatory and carry-over coarticulatory variables result in positive influences during inconsistent misarticulatory behavior.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access