A Story Completion Approach as a Measure of Language Development in Children A task employing a story completion approach was administered to 120 children who exhibited normal language development. Fifteen boys and 15 girls at four-, five-, six-, and seven-year age levels were tested. The test elicits 14 grammatical structures using 28 stories. Significant differences in structures did not occur between the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1977
A Story Completion Approach as a Measure of Language Development in Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lynn S. Bliss
    Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan
  • Doris V. Allen
    Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan
  • Kenneth W. Wrasse
    South Lake Schools, St. Clair Shores, Michigan
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1977
A Story Completion Approach as a Measure of Language Development in Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1977, Vol. 20, 358-372. doi:10.1044/jshr.2002.358
History: Received February 23, 1976 , Accepted January 28, 1977
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1977, Vol. 20, 358-372. doi:10.1044/jshr.2002.358
History: Received February 23, 1976; Accepted January 28, 1977

A task employing a story completion approach was administered to 120 children who exhibited normal language development. Fifteen boys and 15 girls at four-, five-, six-, and seven-year age levels were tested. The test elicits 14 grammatical structures using 28 stories. Significant differences in structures did not occur between the sexes at any age level but males required more prompting. Significant differences in the total number of correct responses were established between the four and five year olds and between the five and six year olds but not between the six and seven year olds. Performance by age varied according to the grammatical structure. Simple structures were produced most accurately by the younger subjects while the more advanced ones were used by the older subjects. Discussion of results emphasized normal cognitive and language development as well as the clinical significance for the assessment of language behavior.

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