Effects of Selected Linguistic Variables on Apraxia of Speech Ten adults with apraxia of speech responded to sentences of an article (pronoun) + noun + verb + article (pronoun) + noun design. Each sentence was presented and then re-presented with the noun in Noun Phrase 1 (NP1) or Noun Phrase 2 (NP2) omitted. The subjects' task was to orally ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1977
Effects of Selected Linguistic Variables on Apraxia of Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Debra Hardison
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Thomas P. Marquardt
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Harold A. Peterson
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1977
Effects of Selected Linguistic Variables on Apraxia of Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1977, Vol. 20, 334-343. doi:10.1044/jshr.2002.334
History: Received September 7, 1976 , Accepted January 24, 1977
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1977, Vol. 20, 334-343. doi:10.1044/jshr.2002.334
History: Received September 7, 1976; Accepted January 24, 1977

Ten adults with apraxia of speech responded to sentences of an article (pronoun) + noun + verb + article (pronoun) + noun design. Each sentence was presented and then re-presented with the noun in Noun Phrase 1 (NP1) or Noun Phrase 2 (NP2) omitted. The subjects' task was to orally produce the omitted word. Sentences were either active or passive and the omitted noun was a concrete, abstract, or nonsense word. Results revealed significantly more errors in NP1 than NP2, more errors on nonsense and abstract nouns than on concrete nouns, and more errors on passive than on active voice sentences. Linguistic bases for these findings are discussed.

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