Listener Judgment of Differences in Stutterers' Nonstuttered Speech during Chorus- and Nonchorus-Reading Conditions The hypothesis that a stutterer’s usual manner of speaking changes during chorus reading was tested. Nine stutterers orally read a passage under chorus- and non-chorus-reading conditions. Stutter-free speech samples of similar prose content were obtained from oral readings made between and within both conditions. Observers were asked to identify pairs ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1977
Listener Judgment of Differences in Stutterers' Nonstuttered Speech during Chorus- and Nonchorus-Reading Conditions
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Roger J. Ingham
    Cumberland College of Health Sciences, Sydney, Australia
  • Philippa J. Carroll
    Cumberland College of Health Sciences, Sydney, Australia
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1977
Listener Judgment of Differences in Stutterers' Nonstuttered Speech during Chorus- and Nonchorus-Reading Conditions
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1977, Vol. 20, 293-302. doi:10.1044/jshr.2002.293
History: Received November 11, 1975 , Accepted December 7, 1976
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1977, Vol. 20, 293-302. doi:10.1044/jshr.2002.293
History: Received November 11, 1975; Accepted December 7, 1976

The hypothesis that a stutterer’s usual manner of speaking changes during chorus reading was tested. Nine stutterers orally read a passage under chorus- and non-chorus-reading conditions. Stutter-free speech samples of similar prose content were obtained from oral readings made between and within both conditions. Observers were asked to identify pairs of samples made under different (chorus/nonchorus) or similar (chorus/chorus or nonchorus/nonchorus) oral reading conditions. The results provided only partial support for the hypothesis. Observers were unable to distinguish confidently the speech sample group that was made under similar conditions from the sample group made under different conditions. However, judges were able to identify correctly samples from four of the nine stutterers that were made under different speaking conditions.

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