Approximations of Selected Standard English Sentences by Speakers of Black English The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in six selected linguistic features as a function of age among children from the North Texas area who utilized features of black English in their oral language. A total of 48 children were tested, with eight selected from each chronological ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1977
Approximations of Selected Standard English Sentences by Speakers of Black English
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nicholas Bountress
    Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1977
Approximations of Selected Standard English Sentences by Speakers of Black English
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1977, Vol. 20, 254-262. doi:10.1044/jshr.2002.254
History: Received December 4, 1975 , Accepted January 20, 1977
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1977, Vol. 20, 254-262. doi:10.1044/jshr.2002.254
History: Received December 4, 1975; Accepted January 20, 1977

The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in six selected linguistic features as a function of age among children from the North Texas area who utilized features of black English in their oral language. A total of 48 children were tested, with eight selected from each chronological age group from four through nine years. Each subject’s sole task was to imitate a series of Standard English sentences. The results indicated that, while a gradual decrease in black English characteristics occurred as a function of age, there was a tendency for the most pronounced dialectal decline in the language of the subjects to occur between six and seven years of age for most of the linguistic features. However, it was observed that black English characteristics did not completely disappear from the surface structure of even the oldest subjects in the study.

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