Effects of Noise and Increased Vocal Intensity on Stuttering The present study was designed to assess the effects of increased vocal level on stuttering in the presence and absence of noise, and to assess the effects of noise on stuttering with and without a concomitant increase in vocal level. Accordingly, eight adult stutterers spoke in quiet with normal vocal ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1977
Effects of Noise and Increased Vocal Intensity on Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sharon F. Garber
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Richard R. Martin
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1977
Effects of Noise and Increased Vocal Intensity on Stuttering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1977, Vol. 20, 233-240. doi:10.1044/jshr.2002.233
History: Received October 10, 1975 , Accepted June 9, 1976
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1977, Vol. 20, 233-240. doi:10.1044/jshr.2002.233
History: Received October 10, 1975; Accepted June 9, 1976

The present study was designed to assess the effects of increased vocal level on stuttering in the presence and absence of noise, and to assess the effects of noise on stuttering with and without a concomitant increase in vocal level. Accordingly, eight adult stutterers spoke in quiet with normal vocal level, in quiet with increased vocal level, in noise with normal level, and in noise with increased level. All subjects reduced stuttering in noise compared with quiet conditions. However, there was no difference in stuttering when subjects spoke with normal compared with increased vocal level. In the present study, reductions in stuttering under noise could not be explained by increases in vocal level. It appears, instead, that reductions in stuttering were related to a decrease in auditory feedback. The condition which resulted in the largest decrease in auditory feedback, speaking in noise with a normal level, also resulted in the largest decrease in stuttering.

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